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Controversy awareness on evidence-led discussions as guidance for students in wiki-based learning

Sun, 08/13/2017 - 23:14
Publication date: April 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 33

Author(s): Sven Heimbuch, Daniel Bodemer

Wikis mainly distribute user-generated content over the article and its corresponding talk page. While educational research provides article-related suggestions for learner's support, research has rarely analyzed the potentials of supporting learning-related processes at the talk page level. With the presented experiment, we address this issue by investigating effects of visual controversy awareness information on content-related discussion threads. Such information can induce socio-cognitive conflicts which research assumes to be beneficial for learning, particularly when contradictory evidence leads Wiki discussions. We investigated how controversy awareness highlighting as implicit guidance directs students' (N =81) navigation and learning processes as wells as their internalized knowledge representations. Results indicate that the implementation of controversy awareness representations helped students to focus on selecting meaningful discussion threads. Our findings suggest that Wiki talk page users can benefit from additional structuring aids and increase their learning outcome when being aware of occurring controversies.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

The incremental predictive validity of teaching, cognitive and social presence on cognitive load

Sun, 08/13/2017 - 23:14
Publication date: October 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 31

Author(s): Kadir Kozan

The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictive validity of teaching, cognitive and social presence from a cognitive load perspective when perceived learning satisfaction was under control. To serve this purpose, this study included hierarchical multiple regression analyses run on data collected in a fully online graduate program. The results indicated that the presences could statistically significantly predict intrinsic, extraneous, and total loads with a small effect size. Individually, cognitive presence turned out to be the best predictor of intrinsic load while teaching presence was the best predictor of extraneous and total loads. Even though social presence was not a best predictor on its own, it contributed to the presences prediction of cognitive load as a group. As a result, all these findings pointed to a small-size predictive power of the presences on cognitive load thereby providing evidence for their incremental predictive validity and the importance of perceived learning satisfaction.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Relations between scripted online peer feedback processes and quality of written argumentative essay

Sun, 08/13/2017 - 23:14
Publication date: October 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 31

Author(s): Omid Noroozi, Harm Biemans, Martin Mulder

Teachers often complain about the quality of students' written essays in higher education. This study explores the relations between scripted online peer feedback processes and quality of written argumentative essay as they occur in an authentic learning situation with direct practical relevance. Furthermore, the effects of the online argumentative peer feedback script on students' written argumentative essay are studied. A pre-test, post-test design was used with 189 undergraduate students who were assigned to groups of three. They were asked to explore various perspectives, and the ‘pros and cons’ on the topic of ‘Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)’ in order to write an argumentative essay in the field of biotechnology. The findings reveal that successful students and groups differ in terms of their feedback quality than less-successful students and groups. This implies that when students engage in high-quality, elaborated and justified peer feedback processes, they write high-quality argumentative essays. Furthermore, the results show that the online argumentative peer feedback script enhances the quality of students' written argumentative essay. Explanations for these results, limitations, and recommendations for further research are provided.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Science-writing in the blogosphere as a tool to promote autonomous motivation in education

Wed, 08/09/2017 - 23:10
Publication date: Available online 9 August 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education

Author(s): IJsbrand M. Kramer, Rashmi A. Kusurkar

We sought to establish a collaborative learning environment for our first-year university cell biology course that would be sufficiently challenging to warrant team effort and turn students into autonomous learners. We chose team-based science-writing blogs, a choice grounded in the Self Determination Theory. This theory posits that a sense of autonomy, competence and relatedness are essential requirements to perform a task in an autonomous-motivated fashion. Through surveys over a period of four years, we assessed how students perceived the blog project. Qualitative analyses revealed that students recognized and appreciated their autonomy. They also consistently considered as positive a sense of competence, expressed as being useful, and relatedness, i.e. relating with others and working together. A quantitative analysis based on an intrinsic-motivation inventory revealed that students experienced science-writing on the web as an intrinsically motivating learning task. We conclude that web-based learning triggers motivation to learn autonomously and discuss how task authenticity may play an important role in this process.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

The effect of self-regulated learning on college students' perceptions of community of inquiry and affective outcomes in online learning

Wed, 08/09/2017 - 23:10
Publication date: July 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 34

Author(s): Moon-Heum Cho, Yanghee Kim, DongHo Choi

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of students' self-regulated learning (SRL) levels on their perceptions of community of inquiry (CoI) and their affective outcomes (task-specific attitudes and self-efficacy). Participants were 180 college students enrolled in a required online course. Using the cluster analysis method, SRL levels were grouped into four levels (High regulators, Mid regulators lacking efforts, Mid regulators lacking values, and Low regulators). ANOVA revealed that highly self-regulated students demonstrated a stronger sense of CoI and achieved higher affective outcomes, compared to low self-regulated students. The finding confirms that SRL could play an important role in the framework of community of inquiry.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Editorial Board

Wed, 08/02/2017 - 23:06
Publication date: October 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 31









Categories: Teaching, Technology

Blended instructional practice: A review of the empirical literature on instructors' adoption and use of online tools in face-to-face teaching

Tue, 08/01/2017 - 05:53
Publication date: October 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 31

Author(s): Michael Geoffrey Brown

College and university instructors are increasingly incorporating online tools into face-to-face teaching approaches, such that blended instruction is forecasted to become “the new traditional model” (Ross & Gage, 2006, p. 168; Norberg, Dziuban, & Moskal, 2011; Watson, 2008). Yet, less than 5% of the scholarship on blending in higher education explores academic practice (e.g. teaching, curriculum design, professional development and training for instruction; Torrisi-Steele & Drew, 2013). This discussion reports the results of a systematic review of the literature on faculty member's adoption and use of online tools for face-to-face instruction. Six influences that cut across the literature are identified: faculty member's interactions with technology, academic workload, institutional environment, interactions with students, the instructor's attitudes and beliefs about teaching, and opportunities for professional development. Strengths and limitations of the literature and future directions for research on socio-technical systems of instruction are identified.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

The influences of an experienced instructor's discussion design and facilitation on an online learning community development: A social network analysis study

Sat, 07/22/2017 - 22:16
Publication date: Available online 22 July 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education

Author(s): Fan Ouyang, Cassandra Scharber

Instructors' discussion design and facilitation have critical influences on online learning community development. Social network analysis was used to examine the development of an online learning community within a graduate-level course, the variations of an experienced instructor's discussion design, and the dynamics of her discussion facilitation. Results indicated that students gradually formed an interactive online learning community. The instructor, overall, played a facilitator role in this community; yet her participatory roles varied within different discussions during different time frames. Her participatory role evolved from a guide in the first class-level discussion, to varying roles, i.e., a facilitator, an observer, and a collaborator within different group discussions at the middle stages of the course, and to an observer in the course's later stages. Methodological implications for using social network analysis in online learning community research, and practical implications for designing and facilitating discussions that foster online learning communities are proposed.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

On-campus students taking online courses: Factors associated with unsuccessful course completion

Wed, 07/19/2017 - 09:00
Publication date: July 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 34

Author(s): Cheryl A. Murphy, John C. Stewart

On-campus students are requesting online course options, and campuses are increasingly providing online sections of core courses, with a common offering involving online science lectures accompanied by on-campus lab courses. However, low course completion rates by on-campus students in online courses have become an area of concern. This study seeks to identify factors associated with unsuccessful online course completion and withdrawal by investigating course completion rates in an online physics lecture course. The authors use eight years of data (N=3032) to establish lecture course completion patterns then compare these patterns with three semesters (N=940) of a hybrid course combining online lecture with face-to-face laboratories. Deviations from established patterns are identified and student characteristics which are uniquely associated with unsuccessful course completion and withdrawal in online sections are isoloated. Differences in rates of students repeating the class, lower rates of repeating student completion in online sections, and early disengagement by repeating students are found to be important. Results imply the need for early course interventions and/or potential policies regarding repeating students.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Effects of online presence on learning performance in a blog-based online course

Mon, 07/17/2017 - 08:53
Publication date: July 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 30

Author(s): Jie Chi Yang, Benazir Quadir, Nian-Shing Chen, Qiang Miao

This study investigated how learners' perceived online presence contributed to their learning performance while participating in a blog-based university course. Although the literature evidently highlights that there is a necessity for online presence in online courses, concrete design approaches and empirical evaluation of the impact of online presence on learning performance in blog-based courses are lacking. An empirical study was therefore conducted to understand the relationship between individuals' perceptions of online presence, in terms of teaching, social and cognitive presences, and their learning performance, in terms of subjective and objective learning outcomes. Research questions were tested and data were analyzed using regression analysis. The results indicate that online presence has a significant influence on learning performance. A subsequent analysis found that cognitive presence played the most important role in blog-based online learning performance. This study also identified a significant relationship in learning performance between students' subjective and objective learning outcomes.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Investigating the impact of learning environments on undergraduate students' academic performance in a prerequisite and post-requisite course sequence

Sat, 07/15/2017 - 08:48
Publication date: January 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 32

Author(s): John E. Wisneski, Gamze Ozogul, Barbara A. Bichelmeyer

Previous studies have compared student performance for the same or similar classes delivered in both online and face-to-face learning environments, however, few studies have explored the effects of change of learning environment play in the student's ability to transfer knowledge gained in prerequisite courses to follow-on, or post-requisite courses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the prerequisite course learning environment on student performance in post-requisite coursework. This study focused on undergraduate accounting, and employed a mixed methods approach to answer two main research questions. First, does student performance in post-requisite undergraduate accounting education vary based on the learning environment of the prerequisite course? Second, how do the learning environments of prerequisite and post-requisite courses influence student perceptions of the undergraduate accounting course sequence? The results of this study indicate that student academic performance in the post-requisite course does not vary based on the learning environment of the prerequisite course. Additionally, while all students report encountering challenges, face-to-face students rely on self-study, collaboration with peers, and tutoring to overcome these challenges. Conversely, online students rely primarily on self-study to resolve similar challenges. The findings of this study suggest administrators should consider offering online prerequisite courses before, or in conjunction with their associated post-requisites, and provide similar access to external resources to assist with student learning challenges irrespective of learning environment.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Comparing student performance in blended and traditional courses: Does prior academic achievement matter?

Sat, 07/15/2017 - 08:48
Publication date: January 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 32

Author(s): Carlos J. Asarta, James R. Schmidt

The performance of students in blended and traditional versions of a collegiate course is compared within the context of students' prior academic achievement. The blended version of the course used flipped and flexible instructional modes, in which only online lectures were available, class periods were used for complementary learning activities, and there was no punitive attendance policy. Significant differences in student performance between the blended and traditional versions were found within two of three zones of grade point averages. At low grade point averages, performance was higher in the traditional version of the course. At high grade point averages, performance was higher in the blended version. No significant difference was detected in the middle zone of grade point averages. Predictive models of student performance were also prepared for the two versions of the course. Partial effects from measures of prior academic achievement upon performance in the blended version were significantly different from partial effects provided by the same measures in the traditional version of the course.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Affordances and constraints of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) for learning and teaching in higher education: Teachers' perspectives

Sat, 07/15/2017 - 08:48
Publication date: January 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 32

Author(s): Yanjie Song, Siu Cheung Kong

This paper reports on a study aiming at examining the affordances and constraints of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) for varied pedagogical practices from teachers' perspectives in higher education. Seventeen teachers from eight departments and centers participated in the one-year study. The affordances and constraints of BYOD were examined under the “framework of affordances and constraints in BYOD-supported learning environment”. Data collection included class observations, class videos, field notes, resources on the BYOD website and teaching plans. Content analysis was adopted in the data analysis. The research findings show that (1) seven types of BYOD conceptualized affordances were identified for varied pedagogical purposes; and (2) three types of constraints of BYOD were singled out in pedagogical practices. Discussions regarding the affordances and constraints are made and implications are explored.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Editorial Board

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 08:48
Publication date: April 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 33









Categories: Teaching, Technology

Editorial Board

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 08:48
Publication date: January 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 32









Categories: Teaching, Technology

Mining for gold: Identifying content-related MOOC discussion threads across domains through linguistic modeling

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 08:48
Publication date: January 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 32

Author(s): Alyssa Friend Wise, Yi Cui, WanQi Jin, Jovita Vytasek

This study addresses overload and chaos in MOOC discussion forums by developing a model to categorize threads based on whether or not they are substantially related to course content. A linguistic model was built based on manually coded starting posts in threads from a statistics MOOC, and tested on the second offering of the course, another statistics MOOC, a psychology MOOC, a physiology MOOC, and a test set of reply posts. Results showed that content-related starting posts had distinct linguistic features that appeared unrelated to the domain. The model demonstrated good reliability for all starting posts in statistics and psychology as well as for reply posts (accuracy ranged from 0.80 to 0.85). Reliability for starting posts in physiology was lower but still provided reasonably good predictive ability (accuracy was 0.73). The classification model was useful across all time segments of the courses; the number of views and votes threads received were not helpful.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

How health professionals regulate their learning in massive open online courses

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 08:48
Publication date: October 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 31

Author(s): Colin Milligan, Allison Littlejohn

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are typically designed around a self-guided format that assumes learners can regulate their own learning, rather than relying on tutor guidance. However, MOOCs attract a diverse spectrum of learners, who differ in their ability and motivation to manage their own learning. This study addresses the research question ‘How do professionals self-regulate their learning in a MOOC?’ The study examined the ‘Fundamentals of Clinical Trials’ MOOC offered by edX, and presents narrative descriptions of learning drawn from interviews with 35 course participants. The descriptions provide an insight into the goal-setting, self-efficacy, learning and task strategies, and help-seeking of professionals choosing to study this MOOC. Gaining an insight into how these self-regulatory processes are or are not enacted highlights potential opportunities for pedagogic and technical design of MOOCs.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Exploring social and cognitive presences in communities of inquiry to perform higher cognitive tasks

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 08:48
Publication date: October 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 31

Author(s): Ramón Tirado Morueta, Pablo Maraver López, Ángel Hernando Gómez, Victor W. Harris

The purpose of the current study was to explore social and cognitive relationships among students when they are solving complex cognitive tasks in online discussion forums (self-regulated). An online course targeting interventions for risk behaviors was developed in the Virtual Campus of Andalusia, Spain. A total of 9878 units of meaning posted in 96 online discussion forums during three academic years (2010–11, 2011–12 and 2012–13) were analyzed through the Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework. The degree to which online tasks at three different levels of cognitive demand (analyze, evaluate and create) triggered cognitive and social processes were examined. The results indicate that there was a specific increasing trend in the frequency of cognitive and social activity according to the requirement of the task. This study also found that the nature of the learning task modulated the different components of social and cognitive presence in these contexts.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Toward evidence-based learning analytics: Using proxy variables to improve asynchronous online discussion environments

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 08:48
Publication date: July 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 30

Author(s): Dongho Kim, Yeonjeong Park, Meehyun Yoon, Il-Hyun Jo

Although asynchronous online discussion (AOD) is increasingly used as a main activity for blended learning, many students find it difficult to engage in discussions and report low achievement. Early prediction and timely intervention can help potential low achievers get back on track as early as possible. This study presented a data mining process to construct proxy variables that reflect theoretical and empirical evidence and measured the accuracy of a prediction model that incorporated all of the variables for validation. For the empirical study, data were obtained from 105 university students who were enrolled in two blended learning courses that used AOD as their main activity. The results indicated the high accuracy of the prediction model as well as the possibility of early detection and timely interventions. In addition, we examined participants' learning behaviors in the two courses using the proxy variables and provided suggestions for practice. The implications of this study for education data mining and learning analytics are discussed.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

A virtual panopticon in the community of practice: Students' experiences of being visible on social media

Tue, 07/11/2017 - 08:40
Publication date: Available online 10 July 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education

Author(s): Jenny Waycott, Celia Thompson, Judithe Sheard, Rosemary Clerehan

It has become commonplace in higher education for instructors to use social technologies to motivate and challenge their students and to support learning objectives. In some instances, social technologies are used to make students' assessable work visible to other people, such as peers and external audiences. This study investigates university students' responses to the requirement to make their assessable work visible online to others. Using the lens of the community of practice framework and the notion of a virtual panopticon, we analysed data from focus group discussions with 20 university students. Our findings reveal that students experienced benefits, such as being part of a cohesive learning community, but also felt conflicted about how much of their work and themselves they wanted to share. Our study highlights the importance of lecturer-student negotiation in the management of online visibility, especially regarding student privacy and identity performance.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

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