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Supporting students' motivation for e-learning: Teachers matter on and offline

Tue, 06/27/2017 - 02:47
Publication date: July 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 30

Author(s): Luke K. Fryer, H. Nicholas Bovee

In e-learning environments that are characterized by minimal peer and teacher regulation, motivation is particularly critical but poorly understood. Students' prior experience with computers and smartphones, as well as the teacher support they receive during in-class instruction (in blended learning scenarios), are essential components of the e-learning experience that must be accounted for when seeking to explain students' motivation and learning outcomes in these contexts. This study therefore aimed to test the longitudinal effects of teacher support, prior subject competence, and prior experience with computers and smartphones, on student motivation for e-learning and finally e-learning completion. Employing five data points collected over one academic year, first-year Japanese university students (n=975) studying English as a foreign language completed surveys at three time points. Cross-lagged panel structural equation modelling was undertaken with the finalized latent variables, prior subject competency (standardized test), and year-end e-learning completion rates. Perceived teacher support was found to have a broad range of direct and mediated effects on students' motivations for e-learning. Effort beliefs were consistent predictors of task value and ability beliefs after accounting for auto-lagged effects. E-learning completion was chiefly predicted by ability beliefs. The practical and theoretical implications for e-learning are discussed.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Applying a web-based training to foster self-regulated learning — Effects of an intervention for large numbers of participants

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 02:40
Publication date: October 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 31

Author(s): Henrik Bellhäuser, Thomas Lösch, Charlotte Winter, Bernhard Schmitz

Trainings on self-regulated learning (SRL) have been shown to be effective in improving both competence of self-regulated learning and objective measures of performance. However, human trainers can reach only a limited number of people at a time. Web-based trainings (WBT) could improve efficiency, as they can be distributed to potentially unlimited numbers of participants. We developed a WBT based on the process model of SRL by Schmitz and Wiese (2006) and tested it with 211 university students in a randomized control evaluation study including additional process analyses of learning diaries. Results showed that the training had significant effects on SRL knowledge, SRL behavior measured by questionnaires and diaries, as well as on self-efficacy. Time-series analyses revealed a positive linear trend in SRL for the training group but not for the control group as well as intervention effects for each of the three WBT lessons.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Identifying significant integration and institutional factors that predict online doctoral persistence

Fri, 06/23/2017 - 02:40
Publication date: October 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 31

Author(s): Amanda J. Rockinson-Szapkiw, Lucinda S. Spaulding, Maria T. Spaulding

Based on a synthesis of traditional attrition models and the empirical literature, an online doctoral persistence model was developed using archival data from 148 candidates. A predictive, correlation design and logistic regression were used to examine if a linear combination of institutional (financial support; program, curriculum, and instruction; and support services) and integration variables (academic, social, economic, and familial integration) could be used to distinguish between doctoral students who persist from those who withdraw during the dissertation process. The entire model, including all institutional and integration variables, were found to significantly predict whether or not online doctoral students will persist in the candidacy stage of the program. Moreover, support services; quality of the program, curriculum, and instruction; academic integration; social integration with faculty; and familial integration each individually contributed to explaining the likelihood of online doctoral persistence. Social integration, financial support, and economic integration were not individual significant contributing factors explaining persistence.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Moving beyond silos: professional learning networks in higher education

Wed, 06/21/2017 - 12:45
Publication date: Available online 20 June 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education

Author(s): Torrey Trust, Jeffrey Paul Carpenter, Daniel G. Krutka

Many faculty and staff in higher education have turned to digitally-enhanced professional learning networks (PLNs) as a means for situated learning that can help them grow in their various professional responsibilities. However, there is scant research on what these PLNs mean to the professional lives of higher educators. We report findings of a qualitative study that investigated participants' perspectives on their PLN experiences through analysis of survey data from 151 higher education faculty and professionals. Data analysis suggested that the anytime, anywhere availability of expansive PLNs, and their capacity to respond to educators' diverse interests and needs, fostered new learning experiences. Participants reported that their PLNs supported professional growth, specifically in the areas of teaching and learning. These findings have implications for defining the present and future of faculty learning and development in a digital age.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Blending a class video blog to optimize student learning outcomes in higher education

Wed, 06/21/2017 - 12:45
Publication date: July 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 30

Author(s): Mei-hui Liu

This exploratory study investigates whether blending a class video blog into face-to-face instruction may simultaneously enhance university students' actual learning performance and affective outcome. Research as to the effects of such a pedagogical approach remains less studied in the extant literature. This yearlong investigation collects multiple data sources from 42 university freshmen in an experimental group (EG, N=21) and a control group (CG, N=21). Results indicate that the EG statistically outperforms the CG in oral proficiency development after the interventions. While there is no significant difference between the two groups in terms of overall and outside-class willingness to communicate in the target language, it appears that the CG perceives more in-class willingness at the end of this study. Qualitative data sources reveal the EG's positive attitude toward joining this shared blog platform and several concerns raised by some of these learners during the learning process.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Scholars in an increasingly open and digital world: How do education professors and students use Twitter?

Sat, 06/17/2017 - 05:26
Publication date: July 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 30

Author(s): George Veletsianos, Royce Kimmons

There has been a lack of large-scale research examining education scholars' (professors' and doctoral students') social media participation. We address this weakness in the literature by using data mining methods to capture a large data set of scholars' participation on Twitter (232 students, 237 professors, 74,814 unique hashtags, and 645,579 tweets). We report how education scholars use Twitter, which hashtags they contribute to, and what factors predict Twitter follower counts. We also examine differences between professors and graduate students. Results (a) reveal significant variation in how education scholars participate on Twitter, (b) question purported egalitarian structures of social media use for scholarship, and (c) suggest that by focusing on the use of social media for scholarship researchers have only examined a fragment of scholars' online activities, possibly ignoring other areas of online presence. Implications of this study lead us to consider (a) the meaningfulness of alternative metrics for determining scholarly impact, (b) the impact that power structures have upon role-based differences in use (e.g. professor vs. student), and (c) the richness of scholarly identity as a construct that extends beyond formal research agendas.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Editorial Board

Sat, 06/17/2017 - 05:26
Publication date: April 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 29









Categories: Teaching, Technology

Clustering blended learning courses by online behavior data: A case study in a Korean higher education institute

Sat, 06/17/2017 - 05:26
Publication date: April 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 29

Author(s): Yeonjeong Park, Ji Hyun Yu, Il-Hyun Jo

Blended learning (BL) is recognized as one of the major trends in higher education today. To identify how BL has been actually adopted, this study employed a data-driven approach instead of model-driven methods. Latent Class Analysis method as a clustering approach of educational data mining was employed to extract common activity features of 612 courses in a large private university located in South Korea by using online behavior data tracked from Learning Management System and institution's course database. Four unique subtypes were identified. Approximately 50% of the courses manifested inactive utilization of LMS or immature stage of blended learning implementation, which is labeled as Type I. Other subtypes included Type C — Communication or Collaboration (24.3%), Type D — Delivery or Discussion (18.0%), and Type S — Sharing or Submission (7.2%). We discussed the implications of BL based on data-driven decisions to provide strategic institutional initiatives.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

A study of students' heuristics and strategy patterns in web-based reciprocal peer assessment for science learning

Sat, 06/17/2017 - 05:26
Publication date: April 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 29

Author(s): Olia E. Tsivitanidou, Constantinos P. Constantinou

This study examined the strategies of undergraduate student teachers participating in web-based reciprocal peer-assessment and how they were associated with learning gains in an inquiry-oriented, science learning environment. Twenty-seven participants from a university in Cyprus reciprocally assessed the digital learning products they prepared as they engaged in a web-based study unit on marine ecosystems and in particular prey–predator relationships. Data were collected through screen-video capture, peer feedback protocols, pre- and post-instructional tests and interviews, as well as the students' learning products. Data were exposed to qualitative analysis and then also treated quantitatively through the use of non-parametric tests. Our analysis led to the identification of a range of student profiles characterizing different peer-assessment patterns. In the peer-assessor role, students were distinguished into autonomous and informed assessors; whereas in the case of the assessee role they were discriminated into engaged but unlucky, disinterested and engaged assessees. Students' learning gains were associated with their actions as peer-assessees and their attitudes towards peer feedback. The findings have implications for teaching practice as well as policy for teaching and learning in web-based learning environments.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

The effects of gamification-based teaching practices on student achievement and students' attitudes toward lessons

Thu, 06/15/2017 - 05:25
Publication date: April 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 33

Author(s): Ibrahim Yildirim

Gamification is defined as the use of game design in non-game contents. Gamification of educational processes can be described as the successful integration of the gamification framework into the curriculum in order to improve students' motivation, academic achievement, and attitudes toward lessons. In this regard, the present study aims to determine the effects of gamification-based teaching practices on student achievement and their attitudes toward lesson. Investigating the effects of gamification on instructional processes and educational outcomes is expected to contribute to the relevant literature as it is a relatively new mechanism. The study is designed with quantitative research methodology and a true experimental design using pretest–posttest experimental and control groups. The study's participants included 97 sophomores from the Department of Elementary Mathematics Education of a state university in southern Turkey in 2014–2015. The experimental group comprised 49 students compared to 48 students in the control group. According to the research results, gamification-based teaching practices have a positive impact upon student achievement and students' attitudes toward lessons.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Learning analytics to unveil learning strategies in a flipped classroom

Wed, 06/14/2017 - 05:25
Publication date: April 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 33

Author(s): Jelena Jovanović, Dragan Gašević, Shane Dawson, Abelardo Pardo, Negin Mirriahi







Categories: Teaching, Technology

Relationships between students' perceived team learning experiences, team performances, and social abilities in a blended course setting

Tue, 06/13/2017 - 01:53
Publication date: October 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 31

Author(s): Yalın Kılıç Türel

The main purpose of this study is to examine relationships between the social abilities, perceived team learning, and the performances of students in a blended learning setting. The participants, 82 undergraduate students, worked in small teams on a research method task over one semester. The instruments used for this study included a five-factor social ability scale and a one-dimensional perceived collaborative learning scale. The results showed moderate significant relationships between students' perceived team learning scores and students' peer social presence scores as well as weaker relationships between team learning and two social ability subscales, written communication skills and instructor social presence. There appears to be an important effect of peer social presence that is linked to learning and performance. Using a blended learning model may have an important impact on increasing social interaction and learning with a team learning approach thereby helping students undertake comprehensive tasks and increase student learning.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Authenticity, relevance, and connectedness: Graduate students' learning preferences and experiences in an online reading education course

Thu, 06/01/2017 - 17:45
Publication date: January 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 32

Author(s): Elizabeth A. Swaggerty, Amy D. Broemmel

This study examined Master's in Reading Education students' learning experiences and preferences in an online two-course sequence designed to foster social learning and the application of knowledge through teacher action research. Interviews, discussion forum posts, and end-of-year course effectiveness surveys served as data sources. When sharing course aspects that facilitated learning, students most frequently referred to (a) synchronous and asynchronous interactions and collaboration with classmates and the instructor and (b) authentic assignments that built on one another, aiding the successful completion of action research projects that were relevant to their current interests and teaching contexts. The strength in online course effectiveness was in communication and collaboration, shared feelings of membership in the online learning community, and the authenticity of assignments and course activities.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

The experience of teaching online and its impact on faculty innovation across delivery methods

Mon, 05/29/2017 - 10:55
Publication date: October 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 31

Author(s): Lorna R. Kearns

As traditional colleges and universities increasingly incorporate online learning programs into their curriculum, it is important to understand the benefits that may accrue to the faculty who teach in those programs, particularly those that influence instructors' continuing participation in face-to-face (f2f) teaching. The purpose of this qualitative study was to provide a greater understanding of how the experience of teaching online influenced instructors' thinking, planning, and enactment in their teaching practice across delivery methods. Four overarching themes emerged: 1) Reflecting on Practice, 2) Creating Structure, 3) Conducting the Class, and 4) Facilitating Learning. Reflecting on Practice occurred when instructors questioned themselves about their teaching goals and objectives. Creating Structure encompasses course planning and designing. Conducting the Class refers to the ongoing consideration of maximizing class time for student learning. Facilitating Learning involved creating conditions that promote student learning. Three trends had an impact on the themes: 1) a shift in focus from teaching to learning, 2) a growing awareness of the affordances of technology and media, and 3) a weakening of the boundary between in-class and out-of-class learning activities.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

The effectiveness of wikis for project-based learning in different disciplines in higher education

Fri, 05/26/2017 - 04:37
Publication date: April 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 33

Author(s): Samuel Kai Wah Chu, Yin Zhang, Katherine Chen, Chi Keung Chan, Celina Wing Yi Lee, Ellen Zou, Wilfred Lau

Concerning the effectiveness of using wikis for project-based learning in higher education, this study compared the perceptions and actions among students in three undergraduate courses of different disciplines, English Language Studies, Information Management, and Mechanical Engineering, who used wikis in their course assignments. Using a triangulation methodology, the study shows that students mostly hold positive attitudes towards the use of wikis for project-based learning. However, significant differences exist in 5 aspects, such as “Motivation” and “Knowledge Management”, in the questionnaire among all participants. Additionally, the level of participation and core actions on the wikis vary among students of the three disciplines. These findings can be explained by the variations in participants' previous learning experiences, their technical backgrounds and the relationship between learning goals and collaborative learning. A series of insights are offered in the context of the use of wikis in project-based learning in higher education.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Comparing the use of a social annotation tool and a threaded discussion forum to support online discussions

Thu, 05/25/2017 - 04:32
Publication date: January 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 32

Author(s): Yanyan Sun, Fei Gao

This study aimed to understand how a threaded forum and asocial annotation tool, Diigo, supported online discussions. Forty-five pre-service teachers in two sections of an undergraduate course participated in two online discussion activities. A crossover study was conducted to examine student participation and interaction, and students' perceived learning experience in the two environments. In the first activity, students in Section A used Diigo for the online discussion while students in Section B used a threaded discussion forum. In the second activity, the two sections switched their online discussion environments. A participatory survey was administered at the end of the study. Postings in the two activities were analyzed and compared in terms of participation, focus, and interaction types. The results indicated that the different design of the two activities and the different functions of two environments impacted student participation, knowledge construction processes, and the foci of discussions. Social annotation tools could be used as an alternative environment to encourage certain types of interaction during online discussions.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

The video lecture

Wed, 05/24/2017 - 04:32
Publication date: Available online 24 May 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education

Author(s): Charles Crook, Louise Schofield

Vocabulary for describing the structures, roles, and relationships characteristic of traditional, or ‘offline’, education has been seamlessly applied to the designs of ‘online’ education. One example is the lecture, delivered as a video recording. The purpose of this research is to consider the concept of ‘lecture’ as realized in both offline and online contexts. We explore how media differences entail different student experiences and how these differences relate to design decisions associated with each. We first identify five features of traditional lecturing that have been invoked to understand its impact. We then describe a taxonomy of online lecture design derived from digital artefacts published within web-based courses. Analysis of this taxonomy reveals six design features that configure differently the experience of lectures in the two presentational formats: classroom and video. Awareness of these differences is important for the practitioner who is now increasingly involved in developing network-based resources for learning.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Learned risks and experienced rewards: Exploring the potential sources of students' attitudes toward social media and face-to-face communication

Sun, 05/21/2017 - 04:30
Publication date: October 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 31

Author(s): David Westerman, Emory S. Daniel, Nicholas D. Bowman

The main purpose of this study was to examine various potential influences (including mass media reporting, instructors/teachers, and personal experience) of students' attitudes toward both social media and face-to-face (FtF) communication. Such questions emerged from recent debates over the role of technology in the college classroom that commonly center on the comparison of FtF and computer-mediated communication (CMC). Of the 545 college students surveyed online, mass media and instructors/teachers emerge as primary sources of information about negative elements of social media, while friends and personal experience are primary sources about the benefits of CMC. Most all sources examined provide positive information about FtF benefits, and none were sources of negative elements of FtF interaction. These findings are discussed in terms of how educators and others might recognize the impact of how they frame and discuss social media in and out of their classrooms.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Comparing online and blended learner's self-regulated learning strategies and academic performance

Sat, 05/20/2017 - 04:30
Publication date: April 2017
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 33

Author(s): Jaclyn Broadbent

The existing literature suggests that self-regulated learning (SRL) strategies are relevant to student grade performance in both online and blended contexts, although few, if any, studies have compared them. However, due to challenges unique to each group, the variety of SRL strategies that are implicated, and their effect size for predicting performance may differ across contexts. One hundred and forty online students and 466 blended learning students completed the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. The results show that online students utilised SRL strategies more often than blended learning students, with the exception of peer learning and help seeking. Despite some differences in individual predictive value across enrolment status, the key SRL predictors of academic performance were largely equivalent between online and blended learning students. Findings highlight the relative importance of using time management and elaboration strategies, while avoiding rehearsal strategies, in relation to academic subject grade for both study modes.





Categories: Teaching, Technology

Cultural impacts on e-learning systems' success

Sat, 05/20/2017 - 04:30
Publication date: October 2016
Source:The Internet and Higher Education, Volume 31

Author(s): Manuela Aparicio, Fernando Bacao, Tiago Oliveira

E-learning systems are enablers in the learning process, strengthening their importance as part of the educational strategy. Understanding the determinants of e-learning success is crucial for defining instructional strategies. Several authors have studied e-learning implementation and adoption, and various studies have addressed e-learning success from different perspectives. However, none of these studies have verified whether students' cultural characteristics, such as individualism versus collectivism (individualism/collectivism), play a determinant role in the perceived e-learning success. This study provides a deeper understanding of the impact of students' cultural characteristics, for individualism/collectivism, on the perceived outcomes of e-learning systems use. This study proposes an e-learning systems success model that includes a cultural construct, individualism/collectivism. This paper reports an empirical study developed through an electronic survey distributed to higher education students belonging to various learning levels and from various universities. The study applies quantitative methods to obtain results. Our findings demonstrate that learners' perceived individual impact is positively influenced by their satisfaction and e-learning systems' use. Results demonstrate the determinant role of individualism/collectivism on individual and organizational impacts. Students influenced by collective culture perceive more individual and organizational impacts than individualistic culture students. Individualism/collectivism also moderates the users' perceived satisfaction on individual impact, and from individual impacts to organizational impacts. The result shows that for the students with a stronger individualistic culture, satisfaction plays a central role in the way they assess the individual impacts, and individual impacts on organizational impacts. This empirical research discusses the theoretical and practical implications.
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Categories: Teaching, Technology

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