Spring 2018 Teaching Learning Symposium

Teaching Symposium

The Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor is pleased to sponsor the Spring 2018 Teaching and Learning Symposium: Motivation, Engagement, Innovation, and Evidence. This symposium provides an opportunity to engage in conversations about teaching and learning, to hear from experts on emerging issues in improving student outcomes, and to network with others seeking to improve teaching at Nebraska.

The Spring 2018 Symposium continues the focus on course design strategies that support student learning. The interactive workshop-style breakout sessions following the keynote will concentrate on topics deemed of critical interest by past symposium participants and will highlight major principles noted in the keynote address, while providing immediately applicable strategies.

Friday, February 23, 2018

12:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Check-in begins at 12:15 p.m.

Nebraska Innovation Campus Conference Center

2021 Transformation Drive

Symposium Follow-Up Materials Additional materials specific to each session can be found in the schedule below

Schedule of Events Learn more about the Keynote and Breakout sessions below

12:30 p.m.

Poster Session

This poster session is designed to promote dialog among faculty about effective and innovative ways to improve and document teaching and learning at UNL. The posters highlight innovative and evidence-based practices to improve student learning. In addition, posters will be presented featuring the many resources available on-campus in support of teaching.

Read the description

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Posters

  1. Exploring collaborative assessment development in undergraduate education

    Anthony Albano, Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology, College of Education and Human Sciences

  2. CCHCP (Cross Cultural Health Care Program) Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

    Megan Kelley, Assistant Professor, Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Education and Human Sciences

  3. From Design Thinking to Design Research: Applying Scholarship of Teaching and Learning to Information Literacy Across Undergraduate Curricula at the College of Architecture

    Rumiko Handa, Professor, Architecture, College of Architecture

  4. Enhancing Agriscience Teacher Preparation Courses through Science Integration and Inquiry-Based Learning

    Nathan Conner, Assistant Professor, Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication, College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

  5. Arriving with Credit: A Study of Writers in 200-Level Composition Courses at UNL

    Deborah Minter, Associate Professor, English, College of Arts & Sciences Inaugural Teaching Academy Fellow

  6. Transforming teaching practices to improve international student engagement and skills

    Toni Anaya, Associate Professor and Instruction Coordinator, University Libraries

  7. Exploring engineering faculty experiences with COPUS: Strategies for improving student learning

    Wayne Babchuk, Associate Professor of Practice, Anthropology, College of Arts & Sciences Inaugural Teaching Academy Fellow

  8. Using Efficacy Theory to Facilitate Instructor Presence in a Redesign of On-Line Introduction to Psychology

    Manda Williamson, Assistant Professor of Practice, Psychology, College of Arts & Sciences Inaugural Teaching Academy Fellow

  9. Computational Creativity Exercises for Improving Student Learning and Performance

    Leenkiat Soh, Professor, Computer Science and Engineering, College of Arts & Sciences Inaugural Teaching Academy Fellow, and L.D. Miller, Post Doc Research Associate, Computer Science and Engineering, College of Arts & Sciences

  10. Peer Review of Teaching Project

    Jody Kellas, Professor, Communication Studies, and Eve Brank, Associate Professor, Psychology, College of Arts & Sciences

Informational Posters

  1. Innovative Instructional Design
  2. University Libraries
  3. Information Technology Services
  4. Jackie Gaughan Multicultural Center
  5. Center for Civic Engagement
  6. Honors Program
  7. Learning Communities
  8. UCARE/Undergraduate Education
  9. Education Abroad
  10. Career Services and Advising
  11. Graduate Studies
1:00 p.m.

Welcome: Judy Walker

Aaron Douglas Professor of Mathematics and Associate Vice Chancellor for Faculty and Academic Affairs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Keynote Speaker: Peter Felten

Assistant Provost for Teaching and Learning, Executive Director of the Center for Engaged Learning, Professor of History, Elon University

Engaging Students as Partners in Teaching and Learning

Typically, we teach to students. What happens if we approach our work differently, aiming to teach with students? Emerging research suggests that engaging students as partners in teaching and learning has the potential to enhance, and perhaps even transform, student learning – and also our teaching. This interactive keynote will explore practical strategies from diverse disciplines for creating and sustaining student-faculty partnerships in teaching and learning.

Keynote follow-up materials

Break and Poster Session 2:10 to 2:30 p.m.

2:30 to 4:00 p.m.

Interactive Breakout Sessions

The 90 minute breakout sessions allow for more time to dive deeply into specific evidence-based teaching methods and provides opportunities for participation, discussion, and interaction. These interactive workshop-style sessions will concentrate on topics deemed of critical interest by past symposium participants.

Choose one from the following sessions:


Course Design and Its Impact on Classroom Management

Panel of Faculty and Instructional Design Technology Specialists including: Kathy Castle, Assistant Professor of Practice, Communications Studies, College of Arts and Sciences; Mark Griep, Associate Professor, Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, Matthew Loar, Assistant Professor, Classics & Religious Studies, College of Arts and Sciences; Alisa Gilmore, Associate Professor of Practice, Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of Engineering; Deryl K. Hatch-Tocaimaza, Associate Professor, Educational Administration, College of Education and Human Sciences; and Eyde Olson and Michael Jolley, Instructional Design Technology Specialists, Innovative Instructional Design

Read the description

Session follow-up materials

Classroom management means creating an efficient and productive classroom environment that allows you to reach all of your students. How you design your course impacts your ability to accomplish this objective. This presentation will focus on key aspects of course design and technology tool consideration to create a rich learning environment that supports student success and decreases disruption and confusion. It will highlight instructional efficiencies that make it easier to manage both large and smaller classes, and note technology solutions and Canvas features that can be of benefit in classroom settings.


Teaching Hints/Helps (Small Teaching Strategies Based on the Science of Learning)

Moderators: Brian Wilson, Instructional Design Technology Specialist, and Tareq Daher, Instructional Design and Technology Coordinator

Read the description

Session follow-up materials

In this speed presentation session, a series of 5 minute talks will cover "small" teaching tips/hints. Participants will have the opportunity to consider how they would apply a strategy to their class and will receive handouts outlining the strategy, research, steps in implementation, examples, and contacts.

  1. Does Prediction Enhance Engagement & Retention? Human Dimensions of Sustainability

    Julia Torquati, Professor, Child, Youth and Family Studies, College of Education and Human Sciences

    This presentation will describe two assignments in an online class. The assignments can also be modified slightly to be used in a face-to-face class. The first assignment requires groups of students to identify 3-5 principles that would promote healthy families and a healthy Earth. The next week, students read the Earth Charter and the Sustainable Development Goals and compare their principles to these two documents. Finally, each group prepares a brief (3-5 minute) video presenting one of the principles in the documents and explaining how the principle is related to human and environmental sustainability.

  2. “But How Can I Process More Deeply?” a Class Activity and Video Resources to Deepen Students’ Levels of Processing

    Carolyn Brown Kramer, Assistant Professor of Practice, Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences

    Many students are accustomed to using study techniques and academic habits that lead to shallow processing of course concepts, which in turn produces weak, isolated, and fleeting understanding of the material. This presentation will include a simple class activity from cognitive psychologist Stephen Chew that demonstrates the benefits of deep processing, along with video resources that present specific suggestions and techniques to help students process more deeply.

  3. Implementation of Group Assessments to Help Increase Student Understanding

    Renee McFee, Assistant Professor, School of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

    Use of group quizzes and exams can allow students to work through course concepts and participate in peer-to-peer instruction. Although students believe group assessments help improve understanding of concepts, certain strategies can increase student satisfaction with this strategy.

  4. Using Concept Maps in Graduate and Undergraduate Seminars

    Libby Jones, Associate Professor, Civil Engineering, College of Engineering

    Graduate and some upper level undergraduate seminars typically involve students reviewing and discussing journal papers. Students new to reading journal papers often struggle with identifying the research questions addressed in journal papers in addition to critically evaluating the methodologies used and the results. In this presentation, I will review a "how to read a journal paper" discussion that I couple with concept maps. Students using concept maps for journal papers better comprehend the papers and better contribute to the discussion on the journal papers.

  5. Great Expectations: Discussing Student Success

    Michelle Carr Hassler, Assistant Professor of Practice, College of Journalism and Mass Communications

    These simple first-day-of-class activities can help set a positive tone for the semester and give students - and the instructor - an opportunity to reflect on expectations and goals.

  6. Engaging Students in Large Lectures With the A-Team

    Amber Messersmith, Lecturer, Management, College of Business

    Professors' and students' visions for large lecture participation often run counter to one another. Professors want participation from students when posing questions, in hopes the lecture will be engaging and help assess student comprehension. Many students want to remain anonymous, sitting back and listening to lectures instead of speaking up in front of peers. Rather than hoping for one courageous student in a sea of faces to respond, the professor can turn to the A-Team. This team is a rotating group of students assigned to spend one class period during the semester in the spotlight, ready to participate by responding when questions are posed, and held accountable for their classroom participation. If you have a question, if no one else can help, and if you can find them...maybe you can call on The A-Team.

  7. Experiences in Teaching Offline and Online Versions of the Same Applied Physics Course

    David Mabie, Assistant Professor of Practice, Biological Systems Engineering, College of Engineering

    MYSM 109 (Physical principles of life sciences and agriculture) was converted into an online course three years ago. There have been several challenges integrating new materials between the offline and online offerings as the course has evolved. This presentation is focused on presenting some of those challenges in identifying how some content works better in the different sections.

  8. Class Warm-Up and Cool-Down: Providing a Framework and Practice for Retrieving

    Sabine Zempleni, Lecturer, Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Education and Human Sciences

    Situation: Several times a semester I talk to frustrated students who take good notes and spend time memorizing definitions but during exams or assignments are at a loss. Students tend to memorize facts and definitions as isolated ideas without connecting them to the overall concept. To practice retrieving concepts, during the first 5 minutes of the class I ask students to complete a framework for the concepts they will work on by filling in as many details as possible from their readings for the day. During the class, students work on applying those concepts. The last 5 - 10 minutes of the class are used to add more details and applications to the framework started at the beginning of the class.

  9. Helping Students Visualize a Good Composition: A Tool for the 21st Century Learners

    Katherine Nashleanas, Lecturer, Geography and Spatial Science and Fellow, Center for Great Plains Studies, College of Arts and Sciences

    Most of us want to include more writing for critical thinking in our courses, but what to do with students who haven't had a composition class yet or those who have but still have difficulty writing? Are they going to be penalized? I have what I like to call a "quick and dirty" way to visually teach composition in my geography classes that puts all students on the same playing field and gives them more confidence and mastery of the composition form.

  10. Scaffolding Content, Discussion, and Feedback

    John Sangster, Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering, College of Engineering

    This format of daily classroom handout can provide one stop shopping for scaffolding the content of your lecture, conducting think-pair-share, getting the muddiest point, and kicking off student recall. As a bonus, preparing it a few days before class provides a review of last year's lecture, and helps to plan out in-class discussions.

  11. 3 Simple Strategies to Design Peer Learning

    Sushma Jolley, Instructional Design Technology Specialist, Innovative Instructional Design

    In this presentation, I will explore how you can design the structure of peer learning to improve student’s academic and social cognitive skills.

  12. Bringing the Shark Tank to a Large 200 Plus Student Class in Marketing - What Can You Learn about Using Similar Activities in Your Class

    Rob Simon, Associate Professor of Practice, Marketing, College of Business

    I use a “shark tank” format model to add a presentation and competitive element to a large lecture type class. The objective is to have the students make a brief focused presentation that integrates the key elements of the class and to give the students feedback from professionals and graduate students. The students create a marketing plan on a non-existent product or service and try to convince a “judge” of the viability of their marketing plan and why the “Judge” should invest in it.

4:05 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Facilitator: Peter Felten, Assistant Provost for Teaching and Learning, Executive Director of the Center for Engaged Learning, Professor of History, Elon University.

Dr. Felten is the immediate past-president of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (2016-17), co-editor of the International Journal for Academic Development and a fellow of the John N. Gardner Institute for Excellence in Undergraduate Education

Assisted by
  1. Anthony Albano, Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology, College of Education and Human Sciences
  2. Megan Kelley, Assistant Professor, Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Education and Human Sciences
  3. Rumiko Handa, Professor, Architecture, College of Architecture
  4. Nathan Conner, Assistant Professor, Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication, College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources
  5. Deborah Minter, Associate Professor, English, College of Arts & Sciences
  6. Toni Anaya, Associate Professor and Instruction Coordinator, University Libraries
  7. Mark Griep, Associate Professor, Chemistry, College of Arts & Sciences
  8. Manda Williamson, Assistant Professor of Practice, Psychology, College of Arts & Sciences

Read the description

Session follow-up materials

In this presentation, the principles of good practice in SoTL will be briefly reviewed, and instructions on how to design, conduct, analyze, and write-up SoTL work will be outlined. The focus of this hands-on workshop will be on getting started on an SoTL project: defining the "problem" and refining your research question. How to integrate your SoTL project into your existing workload, finding resources and collaborators, and ethical and practice issues will be considered. For most of this workshop, participants will be engaged in small group discussions facilitated by SoTL grant recipients and poster presenters.

Adjourn: 5:00 p.m.

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